Occupy Wall Street protests: Rally to go global via London on Saturday

1 Timoteo 6:9-10 But they that will be rich fall into temptation and a snare, and into many foolish and hurtful lusts, which drown men in destruction and perdition. For the love of money is the root of all evil: which while some coveted after, they have erred from the faith, and pierced themselves through with many sorrows.

Revolución 6:5-6 NCV When the Lamb opened the third seal, I heard the third living creature say, "Come!" I looked, and there before me was a black horse, and its rider held a pair of scales in his hand. Then I heard something that sounded like a voice coming from the middle of the four living creatures. The voice said, "A quart of wheat for a day's pay, and three quarts of barley for a day's pay, and do not damage the olive oil and wine!"

“I am convinced that one day soon the powerbrokers of Wall Street, who control our world’s systems – who have worked their magic spells on the world for so long – will suddenly come to nothing.

-Jim Bakker in “Prosperity and the Coming Apocalypse”

For an October revolution, dress warm. That’s the word going outpolitelyon the Web to rally street protests on Saturday around the globe from New Zealand to Alaska via London, Frankfurt, Washington and, of course, Nueva York, where the past month’s Occupy Wall Street movement has inspired a worldwide yell of anger at banks and financiers.

How many will show up, let alone stay to camp out to disrupt city centres for days, or months, to come, is anyone’s guess. The hundreds at Manhattan’s Zuccotti Park were calling for back-up on Friday, fearing imminent eviction. Rome expects tens of thousands at a national protest of more traditional stamp.

Few other police forces expect more than a few thousand to turn out on the day for what is billed as an exercise in social media-spread, Arab Spring-inspired, grassroots democracy with an emphasis on peaceful, homespun debate, as seen among Madrid’sindignadosin June or at the current Wall Street park sit-in.

Blogs and Facebook pages devoted toOctober 15″ – #O15 on Twitterabound with exhortations to keep the peace, bring an open mind, a sleeping bag, food and warm clothing; in Britain, “Occupy London Stock Exchangeis at pains to stress it does not plan to actually, well, occupy the stock exchange.

That may turn off those with a taste for the kind of anarchic violence seen in London in August, at anti-capitalism protests of the past decade and at some rallies against spending cuts in Europe this year. Pero, as Karlin Younger of consultancy Control Risks said: “When there’s a protest by an organisation that’s very grassroots, you can’t be sure who will show up.

Concrete demands are few from those who proclaimWe are the 99 per cent”, other than a general sense that the other 1 per centthegreedy and corruptrich, and especially banksshould pay more, and that elected governments are not listening.

It’s time for us to unite; it’s time for them to listen; people of the world, rise up!” proclaims the Web site United for #GlobalChange. “We are not goods in the hands of politicians and bankers who do not represent usWe will peacefully demonstrate, talk and organise until we make it happen.

By doing so peacefully, many hope for a wider political impact, by amplifying the chord their ideas strike with millions of voters in wealthy countries who feel ever more squeezed by the global financial crisis while the rich seem to get richer.

ENOUGH IS ENOUGH” “We have people from all walks of life joining us every day,” said Spyro, one of those behind a Facebook page in London which has grown to have some 12,000 followers in a few weeks, enthused by Occupy Wall Street. Some 5,000 have posted that they will turn out, though even some activists expect fewer will.

Spyro, a 28-year-old graduate who has a well-paid job and did not want his family name published, summed up the main target of the global protests asthe financial system”.

Angry at taxpayer bailouts of banks since crisis hit in 2008 and at big bonuses still paid to some who work in them while unemployment blights the lives of many young Britons, he said: “People all over the world, we are saying ‘Enough is enough’.

What the remedy would be, Spyro said, was not for him to say but should emerge from public debatea common theme for those camping out off Wall Street since mid-September, who have stirred up US political debate and, a Reuters poll found , won sympathy from over a third of Americans.

A suggestions log posted (“This space is ready for YOUR idea for the revolution”) range from a mass cutting up of credit cards (“hit the banks where it counts”) a “use technology to make education free”.

For all such utopianism, the possibility that peaceful mass action, helped by new technologies, can bring real change has been reinforced by the success of Arab uprisings this year.

I’ve been waiting for this protest for a long time, since 2008,said Daniel Schreiber, 28, an editor in Berlin. “I was always wondering why people aren’t outraged and why nothing has happened and finally, three years later, it’s happening.

Quite what is happening, though, is hard to say. The biggest turnouts are expected where local conditions are most acute.

Italian police are preparing for tens of thousands to march in Rome against austerity measures planned by the beleaguered government of Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi.

Source: The Economic TimesOccupy Wall Street protests: Rally to go global via London on Saturday